Step three: adding SMS text capabilities – The USB modem

You’ll need a USB modem to put it in (some more expensive laptops have sim card slots, so you won’t need a modem – on the other hand they might not work with our system …)

Not all modems work with Linux, we chose one that there seemed to be a lot of support for. Huawei E303 3G 7.2Mbps USB Modem (purchased from Amazon)

We found that the modem did not always get recognised by linux as a modem, sometimes only  the storage capability of the device was recognised which meant the modem became inoperable. Basically you need “enable mobile broadband” to show in the dropdown list illustrated below.

We need to make modem recognition persistent. Here’s what worked for us (for an older usb modem):

 

Huawei Linux Driver Download And Installation

HUAWEI LINUX DRIVER INSTALLATION
Download and install Huawei Linux Driver from the site above  Or follow this link

We found the modem was always recognised after doing this.

Failing this, you may be able to configure usb-modeswitch to do the same (for a newer modem:

 

create a file called 12d1:1f01 in /etc/usb_modeswitch.d

content to be:

# Huawei E353 (3.se)

TargetVendor= 0x12d1
TargetProduct= 0x1001

MessageContent=”55534243123456780000000000000011063000000100010000000000000000″
NoDriverLoading=0

 

 

 

 

 

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